5/20/09

Health & Place: An International Journal

While the community-as-complex-system model is relatively new, it already has a major journal outlet, called Health & Place: An International Journal.

Edited by Graham Moon, University of Southampton, School of Geography, Highfield, Southampton, the journal is dedicated to the study of all aspects of health and health care in which place or location matters.

As stated on its website, "Recent years have seen closer links evolving between medical geography, medical sociology, health policy, public health and epidemiology. The journal reflects these convergences, which emphasise differences in health and health care between places, the experience of health and care in specific places, the development of health care for places, and the methodologies and theories underpinning the study of these issues.

The journal brings together international contributors from geography, sociology, social policy and public health. It offers readers comparative perspectives on the difference that place makes to the incidence of ill-health, the structuring of health-related behaviour, the provision and use of health services, and the development of health policy.

At a time when health matters are the subject of ever-increasing attention, Health & Place provides accessible and readable papers summarizing developments and reporting the latest research findings."

It is important to note that the journal is a combination of both the community-as-context model and the community-as-complex-system model. So, it is important to identify the model being used in a particular paper. Overall, it is an excellent resource for the lastest developments in the field.

12 comments:

  1. As a student planning a career in the healthcare field it has been a real eye opener to understand the connections between community and health. Growing up where healthcare may have been taken for granted you become narrow minded to the ideas that not all people are provided the same opportunities. If I was born within a different family and in a different place how different things may have been for myself or the health of my family members. I am learning more and more each day how our circumstances and opportunities or lack there of can really define our health and overall well-being. As a nurse, bringing these concepts to work may allow us to better understand the a role that health and place play in our society.It may help us as caregivers relate to our patients, substituting empathy instead of passing judgement.
    Yvonne L

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  2. Community and health both tie in together very well. It is extremely important that people teach their whole community starting with their family how important it is to get the proper health care. This is just very interesting how much is taken for grants. It is all so important that we have a healthy environment in your community and our surroundings.

    Eleni T.

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  3. As a child, it never occured to me that where you live may affect your health and healthcare, but looking back now I can see connections that I never noticed before. We moved a lot when I was young, from rural to urban to suburban. My parents both changed jobs several times and they separated twice which left the children being raised by a "single" mother. As we moved from place to place, there were noticable differences in people's health and in their attitudes towards healthcare. In a poor rural neighborhood I remember people saying that they didn't trust doctors. I also remember than the oldest living person around that area was only about 65, and many people had health issues like obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. We once spent a summer with my aunt and uncle who are fairly wealthy. There, people seemed to be healthier, happier, and live longer. The house next door contained a family of doctors-husband, wife, and the husband's father were all doctors. The father was the healthiest 90 year old man I have ever seen. As a child it never occured to me that there were connections between health and wealth, or neighborhood and healthiness, but looking back, it certainly does make sense.

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  4. As a child, it never occured to me that where you live may affect your health and healthcare, but looking back now I can see connections that I never noticed before. We moved a lot when I was young, from rural to urban to suburban. My parents both changed jobs several times and they separated twice which left the children being raised by a "single" mother. As we moved from place to place, there were noticable differences in people's health and in their attitudes towards healthcare. In a poor rural neighborhood I remember people saying that they didn't trust doctors. I also remember than the oldest living person around that area was only about 65, and many people had health issues like obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. We once spent a summer with my aunt and uncle who are fairly wealthy. There, people seemed to be healthier, happier, and live longer. The house next door contained a family of doctors-husband, wife, and the husband's father were all doctors. The father was the healthiest 90 year old man I have ever seen. As a child it never occured to me that there were connections between health and wealth, or neighborhood and healthiness, but looking back, it certainly does make sense.

    Mindi R.

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  5. Health & Place: An International Journal - This journal has many interesting articles that I read by clickin the link and reading from a free issue. It is very important to remember where we have come from when it comes time to help those who have not had the aility to get out so to speak. I grew up in better then some but still worse then most neighborhood where crime and illness surrounded me daily, hince making the choice for me to become a nurse easier. I seen the way a lot of my friends were treated by in the society and how being looked down upon was all they knew, illness and crime are a way of life for many people and they dont even know that there is something different, its almost like its a contagious continuos disease that never stops repeating itself.
    Melissa W.

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  6. I forgot to mention it is sad and it frustrates me.

    Melissa W.

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  7. This is good to know. A collection of experts coming together to aid in our heath and heathcare crisis.

    Stacy M.

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  8. After taking several sociology classes it is gotten easier ( but not quite easy yet) to see the connections between many factors in society and health care. Income is obviously a huge one but I never really thought about where a person lived as influencing their health, now I feel like I grasp the concept of health care and all of its shortcomings a little bit better.
    Alyce L

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  9. While reading these blogs, especially this one, I'm understanding just how much is out there regarding health and community. I'm very interested in the information from this journal, especially coming from a lower income family with most everyone being in labor intensive careers and with little education. I guess I've never realized just how many factors contribute to ones health, and I would've never thought of the community as one of these factors. It almost makes me want to question my neighbors about their health!
    Lynzee A.

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  10. Where we live can definitely influence our health; however, we have a responsibility to rise above it. We are actively involved in community service work and in community development. We have chosen to live on the edge of the inner city. It is not safe for our children to walk in the neighborhood, so we either walk as a family or we allow them to drive to a track outside our neighborhood. The neighbor kids are prone to bad habits, but we don't allow them when they are in our presence or on our property.

    It isn't always easy, but we chose to live in a higher crime area, so we have to be creative, not make excuses when it comes to being safe and healthy.

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  11. oppsie- above comment belongs to Evey W.

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  12. health and community absolutely go hand in hand. where we live and how we are raised defines us of who we are today. how one was raised is a strong indicator of one`s health. Many people do not realize all of the factors that in fact takes to be healthy or not healthy. If an individual does not have the means to live in a better neighborhood and is stuck in one with a higher crime rate it is their choice to either become a fixture their or do whatever it takes to get out.

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